Sunday, December 14, 2008

Matthew Robins - FLYBOY

So, as promised, here is a review of the show I went to see the night before last: Matthew Robins' latest tale of Flyboy, my favourite lonely mutant. (Lonely when Mothboy isn't visiting, that is.)
It was part of a Christmas variety show at the Barbican, also featuring Jarvis Cocker, and pine and turkey fat smells cooked up by Heston Blumenthal. - I really just went to see Matthew, and I honestly think his twenty minutes were the highlight of the evening.

Matthew's Flyboy stories are presented as episodes of song and shadow puppetry. The filigree-cut-outs are incredibly beautiful, I can't quite understand how he makes them, and with moving parts, too... this one shows Flyboy feeding some buns to an elephant, part of the Christmas story...



... just about everything else I saw that evening was a downer - as they promised, in a way, the whole thing being about the darker side of Christmas, the annoying, sad and lonely part of it... but Matthew's story was about being as lonely as you can be, and places colder than Pluto, and it still featured aliens, haunted snowmen and made me smile and cry and be happy. And that's what I want from my Christmas show, thank you very much.

So... if you can catch one of his shows which happen every now and then in assorted London locations, you really should! Here's his website: www.sadlucy.com

and here's a bit of one of his performances - a strange dream Flyboy has one night...

3 comments:

Dave Shelton said...

ooh, was that the show with Mary Margaret O'Hara performing too? If so, how was her bit?

Viviane Schwarz said...

She was actually amazing. Kind of shambled on, had a bit of trouble working out the microphone, said hello in a tiny voice and then belted out a great song. Very proper.

Viviane Schwarz said...

There were some great performances, they just didn't feel very Christmassy to me... I thought it would be about Christmas being difficult and sad in some ways but also good and festive and loving, but they put the emphasis a lot on the former, to an extent that it felt like they didn't even want to do a show, really.
I felt a bit sorry for the "straight" acts (bellringers and children's choir) because it felt a bit like they were there to look silly beside the edgy "don't we all hate Christmas" stuff.

Anyway, there were some great bits...