Tuesday, January 29, 2008

Lynch

Last night I watched David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive", and after that I kept waking up from scrabbling noises. The mice have returned to the studio, just in time to pretend to be tiny people coming to get me... on the good side, in the morning I had a pretty satisfying interpretation of the film in my head. I decided the pale cowboy guy is Death, the blue box is the girl's head, the short man in the curtained room is the sub-conscious that channels reality into our dreams and hopes, the black book is a reference work that would explain the whole story (full of phone numbers, which explains why different parts of reality and vision are phoning each other up all through the film, trying to coordinate), the ragged bum is the demonic hatred that ate sanity and left nothing but the two little old people, and I have no idea who they are, but last night they were mostly mice.

8 comments:

Viviane Schwarz said...

I've changed my mind, the brown person is the Horror of Realisation, personified as the self-image of the hero mirroring her self-inflicted condition. Yes.

Stephanie Roth said...

I remember seeing that one a couple of years ago and and the end thinking, "huh??" We saw one not too long ago that left me feeling like that too...I wish I could remember what it was. Tonight I'm watching AWAY FROM HER-

Eric Orchard said...

Oh man, you're thinking about it way too much. You know it started as TV show and was cancelled part way through and that's why it suddenly gets really weird mid way. That's what somebody told me anyway. My wifes trying to get me to watch Away From Her but I think it passes my depressingness threshhold.

Viviane Schwarz said...

GREAT. My internet connection just ate my complete comment. GRRR.

(Spoiler!!!)

I was going to say: I agree it's truncated, but I think the film makes perfect sense if you assume that most of it is not reality, but the impression reality made on the mind of a dying person. It's a reflection of the reality that led up to her suicide, and the "dreamer" is casting other characters to be different forces that work the horror which in real life she has caused herself. The great source of horror is always the spectre of reality... she manages to right the world in her mind, but just then it all falls apart and she dies. - A lot of the "dream" characters are quite specific, seen like that.

I think the TV series would have let us see the dream-world for longer and maybe more of the reality, too, but it would probably have been similar... like the Twin Peaks movie, they plugged an "ending" on there, too, that was like a rushing-by of what was to come.

ANYWAY I must stop puzzling and start painting monkeys for joy and money!

Eric Orchard said...

"Joy and money" that's a great motivation! I'll have to watch it again, it's been awhile. I found it one of his most difficult films.

Dave Shelton said...

Not seen Inland Empire yet then, Eric?

Stephanie Roth said...

OKay- yeah, it was a bit depressing, (AWAY FROM HER), but really beautiful too...have you seen THE NOTEBOOK? We saw a really romantic one HOUSE ON THE LAKE the other night too- maybe it was just romantic to us since Fred and I had to wait so many years to finally be together...I love these films- they put the focus on what's important in human relationships-

Eric Orchard said...

Well, I could give it a try. Has anyone seen, what's it called..The Butterfly and the Diving Bell? (I know I have the name wrong..)